Thursday, July 11, 2019

Baseball: Revenues up even as attendance dips


As Major League Baseball heads into the second half of its season, there are marked and loudly voices concerns over attendance across the board in the media.  However, in spite of a noticeable drop-off in ticket sales, ticket revenue is projected to increase league-wide by approximately $19 million as compared to the revenue in 2019 according to Two Circles.  This increase is juxtaposed by the projected total attendance of 68.8 million fans, which represents a 1.3% projected decrease in attendance over the same period.




According to Two Circles, this increase can be attributed to the increase in the prices of the average ticket by 2.1% this season.  In real numbers, the average ticket price to a Major League Baseball game has increased from $32.29 in 2018 to $32.99 in 2019.  Two Circles goes on the project that 15 of the 30 teams will see growth in attendance in 2019.  The Philadelphia Phillies (34%), Minnesota Twins (17%) and Pittsburgh Pirates (14% are poised to top the list with the biggest jump in attendance.  The Phillies have shown they are willing to spend some money, what about the Twins and the Pirates?

Unfortunately, there are many teams that are significantly struggling to put fans in the seats -- and by extension -- their revenue is dipping, as well.  The Toronto Blue Jays, Seattle Mariners, San Francisco Giants and Detroit Tigers are projected to have the biggest season-to-season decrease.  All of these clubs project a more than 15% decrease in attendance which also represents a combined loss of just under 2 million fans between 2018 and 2019.

And we haven't even started to discuss the perennial underperforms in Florida... 

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Bruce holds degrees in Computer Science, Biblical History and American History from Temple University, Liberty University, American Public University and is currently pursuing a Doctorate in Educational Leadership at Drexel University.  He is a member of the Epsilon Pi Tau Honor Society, Golden Key Honor Society, Historical Studies Honor Society, and the Saber and Scroll Society.  He has worked in educational technology for over 25 years, specializes in building infrastructures for schools that work to support the mission of technology in education in the classroom.  He also has served as a classroom teacher in Computer Science, History and English classes.  His baseball career spanned almost 15 years from high school, through Division I college ball and big league spring training.  He has coached players at various levels from ages 8 through 18.

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